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Archive for the month “April, 2014”

QUIZ Answers for April CWRT Quiz

 St. Louis Civil War Roundtable

April 2014-Churches

1. What was the name and denomination of the famous church on the battlefield at Sharpsburg?

The Dunker Church, a worship house for German Baptist BrethrenThe land for the church was donated by the Mumma family whose farm is part of the battlefield. Lincoln was believed to have been baptized by a minister of this sect, the religion of his mother.

2. What was the name of the house of worship that lent its name to the Georgia battle of 15-26   May 1864 in Sherman’s Atlanta Campaign?

New Hope (Baptist) Church in Paulding County, Georgia.

3. What 1864 battle was fought around these houses of God: Pole Green Church, Shady Grove Church, Bethesda Church, Enon Church, Walnut Grove Church?

The Battle of Bethesda Church or Totopotomoy Creek on 28-30 May 1864.

4. What church gave its name to a major battle that was part of the Chancellorsville Campaign?

Salem (Baptist) Church served as a hospital for both sides.

5. General O.O. Howard defended trenches against his old pal John B. Hood at the Battle of the  Poor House in Fulton County, Georgia on 28 Jul 1864.  What was the other name for this battle based on a small chapel there?

The Battle of Ezra (Methodist) Church a small chapel in the center of Howard’s line. During the battle Wangelin’s Union Brigade fought behind a barricade of benches removed from the church.  The church was burned during the siege.

6. What was the name of the Richmond church in which President Davis was notified that  General Lee was abandoning the Richmond-Petersburg defenses on 2 April 1865?

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church was consecrated in 1845.

7. What is the denomination of the Shiloh Church which gave its name to the famous 1862 battle?

The rough log meeting house located on the right flank of Sherman’s position was Methodist. The congregation still exists today but in new facilities near the old church site.

8. Father William Corby, CSC, chaplain of the Irish Brigade of New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment, was a member of what order of Catholic priests?

The Congregation of the Holy Cross (Congregatio a Sancta Cruce)and he served twice as president of The University of Notre Dame.

9. What was the name of the congregation of Reverend William N. Pendleton, Lee’s artillerist?

Rector Pendleton left his parish at Grace Episcopal Church in Lexington, Virginia. He was sometimes know as  “Dirty Billy”.Image

10. Leonidas Polk, the Fighting Bishop and graduate of West Point, left the Army to serve as an Episcopal minister and eventually Bishop of the Diocese of Louisiana. What was the name of the church that he and his brothers built and paid for at Ashford in Maury County, Tennessee?

St. John’s Episcopal Church is one of Tennessee’s few remaining plantation churches, which were built to serve a family and its slaves and neighbors.  Probably the most famous person buried in the churchyard cemetery was Patrick Cleburne after he was killed at Franklin. He was moved to Helena, Arkansas after six years. Confederate generals Strahl and Granbury were also buried there on a temporary basis.

11. What are the names of the four guns of the Rockbridge Artillery battery that was formed and trained by Captain (Rector) William N. Pendleton in Lexington, Virginia?

Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. The modified bronze 6-pounder smoothbore guns are today on line in front of the VMI Barracks.

12. What is the name of the Baptist Church where General Grant and his staff famously conferred en-route from Spotsylvania to North Anna on 21 May 1864?

Massaponax Baptist Church was where the conference occurred on church pews in the church yard memorialized by the famous photograph.Grant's Council of War

 

13. What church that gave its name to the 10 June 1861 battle near Fortress Monroe, Virginia?

Big Bethel Church was the name of the engagement. The church walls were defiled with markings left for the Rebels such as “Death to Traitors” by an earlier Union reconnaissance force.                                          

 

                                                             Copyright© 2014 John A. Nischwitz

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St Louis Civil War Roundtable Quiz for April

 St. Louis Civil War Roundtable

April 2014-Churches

 

1. What was the name and denomination of the famous church on the battlefield at Sharpsburg?

 

2. What was the name of the house of worship that lent its name to the Georgia battle of 15-26   May 1864 in Sherman’s Atlanta Campaign?

 

3. What 1864 battle was fought around these houses of God: Pole Green Church, Shady Grove Church, Bethesda Church, Enon Church, Walnut Grove Church?

 

4. What church gave its name to a second battle of the Chancellorsville Campaign?

 

5. General O.O. Howard defended trenches against his old pal John B. Hood at the Battle of the   Poor House in Fulton County, Georgia on 28 Jul 1864.  What was the other name for this battle based on a small chapel there?

 

6. What was the name of the Richmond church in which President Davis was notified that   General Lee was abandoning the Richmond-Petersburg defenses on 2 April 1865?

 

7. What is the denomination of the Shiloh Church which gave its name to the famous 1862 battle?

 

8. Father William Corby, CSC, chaplain of the Irish Brigade of New York Volunteer Infantry, was a member of what order of Catholic priests?

 

9. What was the name of the congregation of Reverend William N. Pendleton, Lee’s artillerist?

 

10. Leonidas Polk, the Fighting Bishop and graduate of West Point, left the Army to serve as an Episcopal minister and eventually Bishop of the Diocese of Louisiana. What was the name of the church that he and his brothers built and paid for at Ashford in Maury County, Tennessee?

 

11. What are the names of the four guns of the Rockbridge Artillery battery that was formed and trained by Captain (Rector) William N. Pendleton in Lexington, Virginia?

 

12. What is the name of the Baptist Church where General Grant and his staff famously conferred en-route from Spotsylvania to North Anna on 21 May 1864?

 

13. What was the church that gave its name to the 10 June 1861 battle near Fortress Monroe?

 

                                                  Copyright© 2014 John A. Nischwitz

William T. Sherman-An Insult Remembered

General William Tecumseh Sherman was a very competent officer.  He demonstrated that many times during his career.   Case in point: the Atlanta and Overland Campaigns.  He directed and controlled the largest army group in the Civil War.  He was a participant with General Grant, President Lincoln and Admiral Porter regarding the Lincoln philosophy about how to treat the vanquished brother states of the South.  “Let em’ up easy” was the President’s viewpoint.

When Robert E. Lee surrendered the terms he was offered were reasonable and generous in line with Lincoln philosophy.  General Joseph E. Johnston was run to ground.  It was obvious that surrender was in the very near term.  Sherman was concerned that a surrender occur to preclude the fragmentation of the Army of Tennessee and drag out the hangover of the war by guerrilla and partisan warfare.  Grant and Lincoln were in agreement.  Then President Lincoln was assassinated an a new president and great pressure to “punish” from the faction that wanted retribution.

Sherman met with Johnston and terms were agreed.  They were sent to Washington for approval.  Much to Sherman’s surprise they were disapproved.  He withdrew his offer and provided the same terms that Lee accepted. Johnston surrendered and his army was sent home to resume there lives.

But…Secretary Stanton published in the newspapers that Sherman was somehow in league with Johnston and Jefferson Davis.  His comments cut deep.  General Henry Halleck echoed the sentiment also in print and in instructions to Sherman’s subordinates. Halleck was posted to Richmond to control the transition to peace.

When Sherman and his armies arrived at Richmond he was invited to a cordial dinner with Halleck.  He refused the invitation.  When Halleck ordered General Jefferson C. Davis to present his corps for a review by Halleck, Sherman refused to allow the review.  When Sherman arrived in Washington during the final Grand Review he encountered face to face Secretary Stanton who offered his hand.  Sherman refused the gesture.  He had been deeply insulted by Halleck and Stanton and would never forget the hurt.

Sherman is very direct in discussing these events in his Memoir.  As I have said before-A Great Read!

Civil War Chaplains

In reading the about the 2nd Fredericksburg and Salem Church recently I saw a reference to a chaplain who was awarded the Medal of Honor.  I remember the chaplains I knew when I was in the service and the contribution they made to our morale in Korea and Vietnam.  I remember smiling as I saw them visiting with the troops in the field. and I decided to investigate chaplains in the Civil War.

 What distinction do Milton L. Haney, Francis B. Hall, James Hill and John M. Whitehead have in common?

All three were chaplains in the Union Army who were awarded the Medal of Honor in the Civil War.

Francis Bloodgood Hall, a Presbytarian Minister, was chaplain for the 16th New York, and cited for his bravery carrying wounded under enemy fire to the rear at Salem Church, 3 May 1863.  Hall was the only non-combatant chaplain presented the Medal of Honor.

 John Milton Whitehead, a Baptist chaplain for the 15th Indiana, was cited for carrying wounded to the rear while under heavy fire at Stones River, 31 December 1862.

 James Hill, 1st Lt, 21st Iowa, captured three pickets at Champion’s Hill, Mississippi 16 May 1863,  Later he was named chaplain of his regiment.

 Milton Lorenzo Haney, called “The Fighting Chaplain”, was elected company commander of Co. F, 55th Illinois and later appointed regimental (Methodist) chaplain.  His award was for his heroism on 22 July 1864 when he voluntarily took up a musket and joined in the fighting.

 Haney was not the only “fighting chaplain” during the Civil War – some 97 Union clergymen carried a weapon during the conflict. Many chaplains filled multiple roles in addition to their religious support – from surgeon’s assistants to line officers. A total of 2,546 chaplains served in the Union Army during the Civil War.

These were Union Chaplains.  What about Confederates?  Father John Bannon and Father Peter Whelan come to mind.  Father Bannon served in the First Missouri Confederate Brigade, during the Civil War.  He was on the field at the battles of Corinth, Fort Gibson, Big Black River, and Vicksburg.  He was detained on 4 July 1863 when Vicksburg surrendered. In August 1863 after being released by Union forces he went to Richmond where President Jefferson Davis and Secretary of State  Judah P. Benjamin asked him to go to Europe to discourage recruitment for the Federal forces and try and get international help for the Confederacy.  He went to Rome and had state level discussions with the Vatican that were unsuccessful in gaining Papal recognition for the Confederacy.  He then went to Ireland to attempt to turn away Irish immigrants explaining that they would be quickly given a blue unirorm, $50 and sent south.  He never returned to the US and is buried in Ireland, the land of his birth.

Father Whelan, a parish priest in Savannah, ministered to his parishioners at Ft Pulaski.  He voluntarily went with them to prison at Governor’s Island in New York.  He was eventually exchanged with the members of his unit.  Returning to Savannah he heard about the suffering at Camp Sumter, Andersonville, and went there to minister to the captured Union soldiers.  He borrowed $16,000 from a friend and bought flour to feed the prisoners at Andersonville.  The prisoners called it “Whelan’s bread”. 

Whelan testified at the trial of Henry Wirz, the commandant of Andersonville,, to no avail.

Both these priests could easily be recognized for efforts of special merit and recognition. 

 

 

 

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