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March St Louis Civil War Roundtable Quiz

1. Who appointed George Pickett to the United States Military Academy Class of 1846?

2. What two brothers attended Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine in the 1850’s? One went on to attend the US Military Academy the other didn’t. One became a general in the Civil War and the other was his aide. Both brothers were wounded during the war.

3. What was the common name normally used for the “Griffin Gun”?

4. What anti-emancipation democrat was a frequent visitor to the White House?

5. When the 1st Maryland (CS) Infantry Regiment assaulted Culp’s Hill on 3 July 1863 at Gettysburg it reported 31 and 1 killed. Who was the one?

6. Who was the Pennsylvania born Illinois music teacher that as an 8-year old child had been kicked by a horse and nearly killed thereby developing a fear and hatred of horses? He became a famous Union cavalry leader and ultimately a major general.

7. Who wrote the bestselling “anti-Tom” novel Aunt Phillis’s Cabin or Southern Life As It Is?

8. What were the names of the two main company streets at Camp Jackson in May 1861?

9. Whose name was the last uttered by Gen. Thomas J. Jackson on his deathbed?

10. What Southern officers and personalities that were honored throughout the Confederacy upon their deaths? (I have six. How many can you name?)

Copyright ©John A. Nischwitz 2016

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SLCWRT Feb Quiz Answers

1. What members of the Lincoln family accompanied the president’s remains on the Funeral Train Journey?
Son Robert Lincoln and his deceased brother William Wallace “Willie” Lincoln, whose casket was also in the President’s funeral car. Mary and Tad stayed in Washington. Lincoln’s cousin, John Hanks and Robert Lincoln were his only blood relatives at the burial.
2. In what battle did a 200 mule charge inspire an anonymous poet to write “The Charge of the Mule Brigade”?
At the battle at Wauhatchie, Tennessee, on the night of October 28, 1863, Union General John Geary’s troops held off the Confederates of General James Longstreet. Some 200 mules became terrified by the noisy battle and stampeded through the night into the center of General Wade Hampton’s southerners. Deciding that this was a cavalry attack, a good number of Hampton’s troops panicked and fled.
3. Union Generals Grant, Rufus Ingalls and Sheridan and others occasionally conversed in what unusual language?
Chinook Jargon was a pigeon-English dialect they learned during their time in the Pacific Northwest before the war. Sheridan lived with a native woman named Sidnayoh. West Point classmates Grant and Ingalls served together at Ft. Vancouver, Oregon Territory. George Pickett also spoke the dialect.
4. What ironclad raider was built is France for the Confederate Navy but was commissioned too late to be of any service?
The CSS Stonewall was built in Bordeaux, France launched 21 June 1864 and commissioned in January 1865 under Captain Thomas J Page CSN. It was the only Confederate warship built in France.
5. Considering the amount of time Civil War soldiers spent in the field, snake bite was not as serious a problem as one might think. How many snake bite cases were reported in the Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion? How many fatalities?
213 bites from poisonous snakes were reported. There were only two fatalities reported including one at Pensacola, Florida where a Confederate soldier was bitten by a coral snake.
6. What was the only US Territory to pass legislation protecting chattel slavery? What was the slave population of the territory?
New Mexico in 1859. Slave population was two (2).
7. According to the estimate of Col J. H. Baker, provost-marshal general in St. Louis, how many steamboats owned in St. Louis had been destroyed during the four years of war by sabotage?
More than seventy with only nine destroyed in combat. Edward Frazor was reportedly paid $35,000 in gold to settle their claims for destroyed US property by Judah P. Benjamin, Confederate Sec of War during the summer of 1864.
8. What was the unique responsibility of the Union company called the Sturgis Rifles?
A separate militia company organized at Chicago, armed, equipped and subsisted for nearly two months by the patriotic generosity of Mr. Solomon Sturgis. The company of Illinois sharpshooters mustered into Federal service on May 6, 1861. They served as part of Major General George B. McClellan’s headquarters bodyguard throughout his time in command. McClellan had been a member of the company prior to the war and outfitted them with the Sharps rifle, an expensive rifle not issued to regular infantrymen. The company was mustered out on November 25, 1862. Commanded by Captain James Steel, the regiment lost one enlisted man who died of disease, for a total of one fatality. The company was never brigaded.
9. What army did Gen. U. S. Grant steal? (Hint: it occurred in December 1862)
When Grant had been give command in the West he was told by Halleck that he commanded all the forces in his area and could use them as he saw fit. About the same time, Gen John C. McClernand had been given authority by President Lincoln and Secretary Stanton to recruit his own army to take Vicksburg. McClernand recruited volunteers in Illinois, Indiana and Iowa and had them assemble in Memphis. When Grant got wind of the competitive army, he sent Sherman to Memphis and moved the entire army south on riverboats to attack Chickasaw Bluffs. When McClernand arrived at Memphis on 29 December he learned his army had been shipped out on the 19th. He was given a corps command under Grant for his trouble.

10. Nominate your list of the ten (10) most accomplished cavalry leaders of the Civil War for the title of “Best
Civil War Cavalry Commander”.
JEB Stuart
Fitzhugh Lee
Nathan Bedford Forrest
Wade Hampton
Phil Sheridan
George A. Custer
Joe Wheeler
David McM Gregg
Alfred Pleasonton
Philip St George Cooke
John Bufford
Thomas Rosser
George Stoneman

copyright ©John A. Nischwitz 2016

Answers to January 2016 CWRT Trivia Quiz

1. Who is thought to have designed the Rising Moon Confederate battle flag?
The “Hardee” flag was believed to be designed by Gen. Simon Bolivar Buckner although some references credit Gen. Hardee. The flag of Hardee’s corps was favored by Arkansas regiments and when the ANV flag was brought west by Gen. Beauregard in a move to standardization, Gen. Patrick Cleburne refused to use it as they were very attached to the blue flag that had Scottish legacy attached.
2. Mr. John Steiner on 25 March 1862 performed what tactical assignment that was unique in the western theaters?
He adjusted artillery fire on Island No. 10 from a balloon, the only balloon operation in the west.

3. Army Captain Henry Maynadier commanded what naval bombardment in March1862?
He was the commander of the fourteen mortar scows bombarding Island No. 10.

4. How was Confederate cavalry commander BG James H. Dearing killed?
During Lee’s retreat in April, 1865, he was mortally wounded in a encounter with Union Brigadier Theodore Read, commanding a combined infantry/cavalry force of Ord’s Army of the James. The two met on the 5th of April at High Bridge above the Appomattox, at the head of their forces, and a pistol duel ensued. General Read was instantly killed, but General Dearing lingered for a few days after the surrender of General Lee, when he died in the old City hotel at Lynchburg.
5. Who was the last general of either side killed in the Civil War?
Confederate Brigadier Robert C. Tyler was killed 16 April 1865 defending Ft. Tyler near West Point, Georgia.
6. What Union unit was known as the “Lightning Brigade” and the “Hatchet Brigade”?
Col. John T. Wilder’s brigade of Reynolds’s division—1,500 men of the 17th and 72nd Indiana regiments and the 98th and 123rd Illinois got their nicknames at Hoover’s Gap in June 1863 in the Tulahoma Campaign. They found horses and mules in the countryside and armed themselves with long handled hatchets for hand-to-hand combat, which caused their unit to be derisively nicknamed the “Hatchet Brigade”. Their more lethal armament were the seven-shot Spencer repeating rifles carried by all the men. Wilder’s brigade had mobility and firepower, but also high unit morale.
7. Who was the war correspondent for the New York Tribune who reported on the Battle of Shiloh and after the war became a financier, philanthropist and founder of the company we know as General Electric?
Henry Villard was the representative of a news agency established by him in Washington and was often at the front. Out of his experiences reporting the Civil War, he became a confirmed pacifist.
8. What were the duty stations of Captain Lewis A. Armistead and Captain Winfield Scott Hancock when they celebrated their famous parting before the Civil War?
Armistead was at the New San Diego Depot and Hancock was an assistant quartermaster at Los Angeles under Brevet Brigadier Albert Sidney Johnston.
9. Who is the highest ranking Confederate general officer buried in a St. Louis cemetery?Lieutenant General (temporary) Alexander Peter Stewart, who was commander of the III Corps of the Army of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville and Commanding General of the Army of Tennessee under Joe Johnston in the Carolinas. He is buried at Bellefontaine Cemetery.
10. Who were Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston’s Confederate Corps Commanders at Shiloh?
John C. Breckinridge, William Hardee, Braxton Bragg and Leonides K. Polk. PGT Beauregard was his second in command and the officer who drew up the battle plan. Stationed in the rear by Johnston he was not able to take command when Johnston was killed. The ranking officer at the front was Bragg, who called of the offensive against Grant’s last line.

11. What Civil War developments had a profound effect on all of future military thinking? (I have 6 there may be more)(This is a thinking question just scour you memory)
• 8 March 1852 wooden navies became obsolete at the Battle of Hampton Roads
• 24 June 1863 single shot weapons became obsolete when Wilder’s Brigade engage Confederates with Spencer repeating rifles at Hoover’s Gap
• 17 February 1864 surface vessels at risk USS Housatonic sunk by CSS Hunley.
• 22 May 1863 Union conducts first synchronized assault on line from Stockade Redan to Ft. Garrott at Vicksburg due to availability of inexpensive pocket watch.
• The possibilities of air reconnaissance and attack from the air were the progeny of the balloon corps.
• Grant’s and Sherman’s concept of total war became the war philosophy of the future.
(There are many many other technical developments)

Copyright ©John A. Nischwitz 2016

CWRT St Louis January 2016 Quiz

January 2016

1. Who is thought to have designed the Rising Moon Confederate battle flag?

2. Mr. John Steiner on 25 March 1862 performed what tactical assignment that was unique in the western theaters?

3. Army Captain Henry Maynadier commanded what naval bombardment in March1862?

4. How was Confederate cavalry commander BG James H. Dearing killed?

5. Who was the last general of either side killed in the Civil War?

6. What Union unit was known as the “Lightning Brigade” and the “Hatchet Brigade”?

7. Who was the war correspondent for the New York Tribune who reported on the Battle of Shiloh and after the war became a financier, philanthropist and founder of the company we know as General Electric?

8. What were the duty stations of Captain Lewis A. Armistead and Captain Winfield Scott Hancock when they celebrated their famous parting before the Civil War?

9. Who is the highest ranking Confederate general officer buried in a St. Louis cemetery?

10. Who were Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston’s Confederate Corps Commanders at Shiloh?

11. What Civil War developments had a profound effect on all of future military thinking? (I have 6 there may be more)(This is a thinking question just scour you memory)

Copyright ©John A. Nischwitz 2016

Answers December 2015 CWRT Quiz

St. Louis Civil War Roundtable
Nov-December 2015
1. What tradition, that still exists in the south today, about a New Year’s Day culinary delicacy which owes its origin to Sherman’s March through Georgia?
Eating black-eyed peas is thought to bring prosperity and good luck. Sherman’s bummers took everything edible and left the population virtually destitute, except black-eyed peas or cowpeas, which they considered inedible by humans and only fit for livestock. The southern population subsisted on the abandoned stocks of this legume until they could get new crops planted and harvested after the war was over.
2. Muppet master Jim Henson may have inherited some of his artistic talent from what Confederate cartographer, who was a protégée of Jedediah Hotchkiss in Jackson’s Corps, a veteran of the US Coast Survey organization, and his grandfather?
Captain Oscar Hinrichs, the Prussian born surveyor and map maker, who worked for the US Coast Survey from 1855 to 1860 along the southeast US coast. He defected after the fall of Ft. Sumter and prepared maps for General Thomas J. Jackson.
3. What Confederate state capitals were ransacked and burned by General Sherman and his armies during the war?
Jackson, Mississippi in 1863; Columbia, South Carolina and Milledgeville, Georgia were burned. Raleigh, North Carolina was also taken by Sherman but was not burned due to Sherman’s belief that North Carolina was a reluctant rebel state. His army also marched through Richmond en-route to the Grand Review.
4. What Confederate unit attacked in white uniforms and routed the enemy?
Gen. Sterling Price’s 1st Missouri Guard Division at Pea Ridge in the evening of 7 March 1862. They were wearing un-dyed cotton uniforms which appeared eerily white coming out of the forest. The 2d Texas also wore un-died uniforms at Shiloh.
5. The Union Army of the West was effectively constituted twice during the Civil War. Who were the two commanders and where did the armies come together each time?
At Shiloh for the move against Corinth under Gen. Henry Halleck was the first. At Chattanooga under General Grant for the relief of that city was the second. Sherman made it official and took it south to Atlanta. There was also a Confederate Army of the West under Gen. Earl Van Dorn. Lyon’s Union Army at Wilson’s Creek was referred to as Army of the West.
6. What is unique about colored Union Private J. R. Kealoha, who recently was given a civilian tombstone for his unmarked grave?
Private Kealoha was a member of the 41st Infantry Regiment USCT, Army of the James. He is buried in Oahu Cemetery. He was one of some 119 native Hawaiians who served in the Civil War. Most served the Union but a few were part of the Confederate Navy. Most served under false names and therefore are difficult to trace. They used nome d’guerre because they were in fact citizens of a foreign nation at the time with sympathy for the South. The 41st was recruited and organized in the Philadelphia area. Hawaiians and Indians were considered colored.
7. What were the national political parties of the Confederacy?
No parties were established to avoid the political wrangling experienced by the United States. Two factions ultimately emerged, one was pro-Davis Administration and was universally opposed to it on almost every issue. There were some local and regional parties for favorite son candidates and issues.
8. What company invented the first automated candy making machine and advertised their product for families to send to Union servicemen during the Civil War?
The New England Confectionary Company first produced NECCO Wafers in 1847. Oliver Chase, an English immigrant, invented a lozenge cutting machine with which he produced the wafers. At the time of the Civil War, these were called “hub wafers” and were popularly carried by Union soldiers.

9. What Civil War battles included a forced river crossing against an enemy actively defending the far shore?
• Burnside at Fredericksburg
* Custer at Chickahominy 24 May 1862
• Grant at Bruinsburg
• Burnside at Antietam
• Byram’s Ford I and II over the Big Blue River 22Oct64 (US Gen. Blunt defended
against Jo Shelby) and 23 Oct 64(CS Gen.Marmaduke defended against Pleasanton)
• Grant deferred at North Anna do to the strength of Lee’s defensive position.
* Balls Bluff
* Stones River
AND MAYBE MORE!!

Copyright ©John A. Nischwitz 2015

December 2015 Roundtable Quiz

St. Louis Civil War Roundtable
Nov-December 2015

1. What tradition, that still exists in the South today, about a New Year’s Day culinary delicacy owes its origin to Sherman’s March through Georgia?

2. Muppet master Jim Henson may have inherited some of his artistic talent from what Confederate cartographer, who was a protégée of Jedediah Hotchkiss in Jackson’s Corps, a veteran of the US Coast Survey organization, and his grandfather?

3. What Confederate state capitals were ransacked and burned by General Sherman and his army during the war?

4. What Confederate unit attacked in white uniforms and routed the enemy?

5. The Union Army of the West was effectively constituted twice during the Civil War. Who were the two commanders and where did the armies come together each time?

6. What is unique about colored Union Private J. R. Kealoha, who recently was given a civilian tombstone for his unmarked grave?

7. What were the political parties of the Confederacy?

8. What company invented the first automated candy making machine and advertised their product for families to send to Union servicemen during the Civil War?

9. What Civil War battles included a forced river crossing against an enemy actively defending
the far shore? (I have 5 there may be more)

Copyright ©John A. Nischwitz 2015

Answers to October 2015 SLCWRT Quiz

St. Louis Civil War Roundtable-October 2015
1. Who was the first American spy to be executed since Nathan Hale in 1776?
Timothy Webster, a Pinkerton agent, was hanged in Richmond on 29 April 1862.
2. Who was the source from whom Rose O’Neal Greenhow reputedly gained the information on the Union movement to 1st Bull Run that she sent to Gen Beauregard?
Senator Henry D. Wilson,(R-Mass), Chairman of the the Committee on Military Affairs and the Militia, In that capacity, Wilson passed on over 15,000 nominations that Lincoln submitted during the course of the War, and worked closely with him on legislation affecting the Army and Navy. Wilson was elected Vice President of the United States on the Republican ticket with President Ulysses S. Grant in 1873 and served until his death two years later.
3. “Crazy Bet” was a Union agent in Richmond. What was her real name and how did she get the valuable information that she passed on to Washington?
Elizabeth Van Lew had her personal servant Mary Jane Bowser hired by Mrs. Davis as a house servant. She was highly gifted and could read so she was able to memorize information on President Davis’ desk and pass it on clearly to Union officials.
4. Confederate agents in Canada planned to capture what Union warship in an attempt to release the officer prisoners at Johnson Island Prison?
Lt. John Y. Beall planned to capture the USS Michigan, a steel hulled side wheel steamer. He was captured at Niagara Falls and hanged for espionage on 24 February 1865.
5. How did the famed Confederate spy Rose O’Neal Greenhow die?
She drowned running the blockade with $2000 in gold sovereigns in a bag around her neck and a satchel of documents off the coast of Cape Fear near Ft. Fisher when the ship Condor grounded on 1 October 1864 in a furious storm and she insisted in being put into a lifeboat.
6. Where did Belle Boyd, famous for carrying dispatches and information on Union dispositions and very helpful to Stonewall Jackson, gain her reputation?
In the Shenandoah Valley and especially around Front Royal.
7. What was the name of the Unionist informant that advised Gen. Phil Sheridan that one of Gen. Early’s infantry divisions and an artillery battalion had left the Shenandoah Valley to join Gen. Robert E. Lee’s army near Petersburg? The young woman, who had now become a spy, and the Union general communicated by writing on thin tissue paper placed in a tiny capsule that Thomas Laws, her slave, carried in his mouth when passing through Rebel lines? Her information aided Sheridan at the Third Battle of Winchester on 19 September 1864.
Rebecca Wright. After the war, Wright received a note of thanks from Sheridan that it was her “information that the battle was fought and probably won.” Accompanying the note was a gift of a gold watch set in pearls, which she would cherish. Totally ostracized by her neighbors in Winchester, Wright moved to Philadelphia; and, through Sheridan’s intercession, was awarded a position in the Treasury Department. She became a celebrity in the North, often invited to women’s suffrage and Grand Army of the Republic events.
8. What behind the lines operation resulted in the first awards of the Medal of Honor?
The Union attempt to destroy the railroad from Atlanta to Chattanooga often called the Great Locomotive Chase was led by civilian James J. Andrews, who did not qualify for the medal because he was not officially in the military. Eight were hanged as spies and eighteen were awarded the Nation’s highest honor.
9. Who was the Union spy, recruited by Alan Pinkerton, who disguised herself as a black woman and as a man to gather intelligence information?
Emma Edmonds enlisted as a man, Frank Thompson, and often had to disguise herself as a black woman or a male soldier. Consider a woman posing as a man disguised as a black woman!
10. Who was the Confederate agent famously responsible for burning riverboats on the St. Louis levee?
Robert Louden was an arsonist who on his deathbed in 1867 claimed to have sabotaged the steamer Sultana.
11. Who assumed the responsibility for Union intelligence as head of The Bureau of Military Information when Alan Pinkerton resigned? Gen. Winfield Scott hired Lafayette C. Baker then Gen Hooker appointed lawyer and Colonel George H. Sharpe on 11 February 1863 who founded the BMI.
12. What Union generals issued emancipation orders or decrees that caused President Lincoln to have to issue rescind orders? (I am aware of three.)
• John C. Frémont, St. Louis, MO, Headquarters Western Department, 31 Aug 1861
• Benjamin Butler, Ft. Monroe, VA, never issued an emancipation proclamation but detained freedom seeking runaways as “contraband of war”. Lincoln sustained Butler’s action with the Confiscaton Act of August 1861. Other commanders followed Butler’s precedent.
• David Hunter, Hilton Head, SC, Headquarters Department of the South, 9 May 1862.

Copyright ©John A. Nischwitz 2015

St Louis Civil War Roundtable Oct 15 Quiz

St. Louis Civil War Roundtable-October 2015

1. Who was the first American soldier to be executed as a spy since Nathan Hale in 1776?

2. Who was the source from whom Rose O’Neal Greenhow reputedly gained the information on the Union movement to 1st Bull Run which she sent to Gen Beauregard?

3. “Crazy Bet” was a Union agent in Richmond. What was her real name and how did she get the valuable information that she passed on to Washington?

4. Confederate agents in Canada planned to capture what Union warship in an attempt to release the officer prisoners at Johnson Island Prison?

5. How did the famed Confederate spy Rose O’Neal Greenhow die?

6. Where did Belle Boyd, famous for carrying dispatches and information on Union dispositions and very helpful to Stonewall Jackson, gain her reputation?

7. What was the name of the Unionist informant that advised Gen. Phil Sheridan that one of Early’s infantry divisions and an artillery battalion had left the Shenandoah Valley to join Gen. Robert E. Lee’s army near Petersburg? The young woman, who had now become a spy, and the Union general communicated by writing on thin tissue paper placed in a tiny capsule that Thomas Laws, her slave, carried in his mouth when passing through Rebel lines. Her information aided Sheridan at the Third Battle of Winchester on 19 September 1864.

8. What behind the lines operation resulted in the first awards of the Medal of Honor?

9. Who was the Union spy, recruited by Alan Pinkerton, who disguised herself as a man,as a black woman and as a man to gather intelligence information?

10. Who was the Confederate agent famously responsible for burning riverboats on the St. Louis levee?

11. Who assumed the responsibility for Union intelligence as head of The Bureau of Military Information when Alan Pinkerton resigned?

12. What Union generals issued emancipation orders or decrees that caused President Lincoln to have to issue rescind orders? (I am aware of three)

Copyright ©John A. Nischwitz 2015

Answers to September 2105 Quiz

1. Bellefontaine (cemetery)Times listed the following people as Civil War personalities in residence. Match the name with the activity or accomplishment.

a. Tony Faust (g ) Wounded at Vicksburg
b. Cornelius DeJong ( e ) Died in 1850-no involvement
c. Martin Lammert ( i ) Married Louisa Volker, telegrapher, City street superintendent
d. Nathan Pratte (f ) Wrote love letters to Molly
e. Gen. Richard B. Mason ( a ) Became prominent restaurateur
f. Captain James Love ( b ) Killed by Rebel gunfire while on steamship
g. Adaline Couzins ( h ) Financier who supplied cannons and long arms
h. Giles Filley ( d ) Police officer killed during secessionist conflict
i. Captain Thos. H. Macklind ( c ) Future furniture pioneer at Camp Jackson affair
(Answers: g,e,I,f,a,b,h,d,c)

2. What was the Civil War use of a sabot?
A device made of wood, paper machѐ, copper, wrought iron or lead that allowed a projectile to grip the rifling in an artillery piece. Gunners were not fond of wooden sabots as the tended to fly apart as they left the muzzle and injured the gun crew. Sabots are used today on anti-armor rounds in US main battle tanks to stabilize the tungsten carbide bolt that is the projectile in the anti-tank round.
3. What was the technical difference between a solid shot and a bolt?
Solid shot is fired from a smooth bore cannon and a bolt is an un-exploding round fire by a rifled gun. Confederate bolts were Archer, Burton, Schenkl, Parrott, and Whitworth. Union gunners fired bolts of Parrott and Hotchkiss design.
4. What is the only rifled artillery bolt that did not utilize a sabot?
The Whitworth 12-pounder hexagonal bolt was made to conform to the lands and grooves of the weapon. Virtually all the rounds were made in England and brought through the blockade.
5. Who was General Lee’s “bad old man”?
General Jubal Early. He was an extortionist at Middletown, PA, Frederick, Maryland and Hagerstown, PA. When Chambersburg would not pay his demanded ransom he had the town burned. Health problems caused him to be in bad temper and cranky much of the time. He was always a contrarian. He is regarded as the Confederacy’s hard-war general.
6. Where was Johnson’s Island prisoner of war camp located?
On Johnson’s Island in Sandusky, Ohio Bay in Lake Erie.
7. What were the three banks that were robbed at St. Alban’s Vermont? What did the partisans do with the civilian population?
The First National Bank, The St. Alban’s Bank and the Franklin County Bank. They rounded up the townspeople and held then in the town square park.
8. Why did the USS Michigan, the most technologically advanced warship in the US Navy at the time, not join the blockade of Confederate ports?
It could not get out of Lake Erie as it was too wide to go through the Welland Canal locks from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario.

9. Famous weddings of the Civil War:.
• Lt. John Wills “Gimlet” Lea, 5th North Carolina Vol. Infantry, married Miss Margaret Durfey 18 Aug 1862. Captain George A. Custer was best man. Lea wore a new gray uniform and Custer, a brand new captain, Union blue.
• Brigadier General John Hunt Morgan wed Miss Mattie Ready 14 December 1862 in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Bishop (Gen) Polk presided. Attending were Generals Cheatham, Hardee, Breckinridge, Hanson and Col. Basil Duke.
• Major General George A. Custer married Miss Elizabeth “Libbie” Bacon in Monroe, Michigan on 9 Feb 1864, it was widely reported in all the major newspapers.
• Lt. General Richard Ewell to Mrs. Lizinka Campbell Brown 26 May 1863 in Richmond, VA. Mrs. Brown was his first cousin and they fell in love while she nursed him after he lost his leg at Groveton. He always referred to her as “Mrs. Brown”. She served as his headquarters unofficial chief-of-staff.
• Major William Clare to Miss Mary Hadley on 12 Dec 1864 at Nashville’s Traveler’s Rest. Seven Confederate Generals in full dress uniform were reported to be in attendance including Gen. John Bell Hood.
• Major General George Pickett wed Miss Sallie Ann “LaSalle” Corbell on 15 September 1863 at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Petersburg, Virginia. Unable to get a furlough after Gettysburg for the nuptials, he got permission for “special duty” to leave the front lines.
• Isabelle Marie (Belle) Boyd wed ex-LT. Samuel Wylde Hardinge on August 25, 1864 at St. James Church, Piccadilly, London, England. Belle was a famous southern spy and personality and Hardinge met and was infatuated by her when he was part of the US Navy ship that captured her on the blockade runner Greyhound on its run in.
• A most famous non-wedding. Confederate General John Bell Hood wanted to marry Sally Buchanan (Buck) Preston but her parents influenced her to break it off and accompany them to Europe. She broke off the relationship on Christmas Eve 1864. After the war he married Anna Marie Hennen, with whom they had 11 children over 10 years, including three pairs of twins.
• Katherine Jane (Kate) Chase, daughter of US Treasury Secretary Salmon P. Chase, married Rhode Island governor William A. Sprague on November 12, 1863. It was the event of the season. Sprague accompanied the Rhode Island Brigade of volunteers under Ambrose Burnside through the First Battle of Bull Run. The couple divorced in 1882.
• Brigadier John A. Rawlins, trusted staff officer of General Grant, married Mary Emeline (Emma) Hurlburt in Danbury, Connecticut on December 24, 1863. Emma was in Vicksburg as governess to the Lum family’s children. Grant used the Lum home as his headquarters. Rawlins’ first wife had died of tuberculosis and left three children. Rawlins himself died of consumption in 1869 and Mary also in 1874.

September 2015 Roundtable Quiz

St. Louis Civil War Roundtable
September 2015

1. Bellefontaine (cemetery)Times listed the following people as Civil War personalities in residence. Match the name with the activity or accomplishment.

a. Tony Faust ( ) Wounded at Vicksburg
b. Cornelius DeJong ( ) Died in 1850-no involvement
c. Martin Lammert ( ) Married Louisa Volker, telegrapher, City street superintendent
d. Nathan Pratte ( ) Wrote love letters to Molly
e. Gen. Richard B. Mason ( ) Became prominent restaurateur
f. Captain James Love ( ) Killed by Rebel gunfire while on steamship
g. Adaline Couzins ( ) Financier who supplied cannons and long arms
h. Giles Filley ( ) Police officer killed during secessionist conflict
i. Captain Thos. H. Macklind ( ) Future furniture pioneer at Camp Jackson affair

2. What was the Civil War use of a sabot?

3. What was the technical difference between a solid shot and a bolt?

4. What is the only rifled artillery bolt that did not utilize a sabot?

5. Who was General Lee’s “bad old man”?

6. Where was the Federal Johnson’s Island prisoner of war camp located?

7. What were the three banks that were robbed at St. Alban’s Vermont? What did the partisans do with the civilian population?

8. Why did the USS Michigan, the most technologically advanced warship in the US Navy at the time, not join the blockade of Confederate ports?

9. THIS IS A NEW TYPE QUESTION FOR WHICH THERE ARE NUMEROUS ANSWERS. LIST ALL YOU CAN. A QUESTION OF THIS TYPE WII BE ON EACH
QUIZ THIS CAMPAIGN.

There were numerous weddings involving famous Civil War personalities. These events are often referred to in many the writings of the war. List all the weddings you can remember. I am aware of seven!! There may be more!!

Copyright ©John A. Nischwitz 2015

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